A Late Spring’s produce

I think it’s a case of being careful what you wish for.  During summer we were practically doing a rain dance, so desperate were we for a shower of rain to fill the tanks and freshen up the parched paddocks.

Now here we are in spring, inundated.  The once-dry paddocks are a mushy bog, with streams running through them, filled with the run-off from the hills and quarries behind us.  In the quiet of the evening, and even during the day, you can hear the once tiny stream that runs though our neighbour’s property raging as it gushes over the weir and down toward the Derwent River.

I decided to do a bit of mowing after a comparatively dry day or two – it was reminiscent of Paul Simon’s Slip Sliding Away.  I did a little better than Robert – he became bogged, but then to be fair, he was using the ancient ride-on mower that came with the property.  I was using the much better zero turn version.

Everything looks marvellous though – so green and lush.

Finally some spring produce is coming in.  Several kilos of fresh picked field strawberries arrived.  Then a friend brought us bucketfuls of beautiful, organically grown rose petals.  A marriage made in heaven.  Strawberry and rose petal jam.

Strawberry vinegar, ideal to use as a salad dressing and then strawberry chilli sauce soon followed.  And rose petal syrup to serve over ice cream or pancakes, and a brew of sparkling rose petal is now almost ready to drink.

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I’ve been able to get some lovely local cabbages too, and so quickly made sauerkraut, which is now fermenting away in jars on the bench.  A few days later, Kimchi joined the ferments on the go.

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The forecast tells us that the cool, rainy weather is soon to pass. In the intriguing way of our Tasmanian climate, by the end of the week we will be experiencing (for us) almost tropical weather with temperatures around 27 degrees for 3 or 4 days.

While I wait for more produce to mature (which won’t take long at that rate), I think it would be good to research edible weeds, as I’m sure that they will be the first to thrive now spring is finally on the doorstep.

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